Street Views

The story behind Place Casault

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Photo: Screenshot from Google Maps

Place Casault is on the campus of Université Laval in front of the pavilion named in honour of Louis-Jacques Casault (1808-1862). Casault was a priest, academic, superior of the Séminaire de Québec and the first rector of Université Laval.

The story behind Avenue des Cent-Associés

STREET VIEWS

This street is named after La Compagnie des Cent-Associés, or Company of the One Hundred Associates, a French trading and colonization company chartered by Cardinal Richelieu in 1627. It was founded both to capitalize on the North American fur trade and to expand French colonies which were at that time centred on the St. Lawrence River valley and the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

The story behind Rue Carleton

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Screenshot from Google Maps

This narrow street within the walls of Old Quebec is named in honour of Sir Guy Carleton (1724-1808). In 1786, he was raised to the peerage as Lord Dorchester, Baron of Dorchester in the County of Oxford. Rue Dorchester in the Saint-Roch district of Quebec City is also named after him.

The story behind Place des Canotiers

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin from QCT archives

The name Place des Canotiers was chosen following a public competition held by the Ville de Québec in 2015 to name a public park on Rue Dalhousie at the foot of Côte de la Montagne.

The story behind Rue du Campanile

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Screenshot from Google Maps

Rue du Campanile is a private street that takes its name from the tall brick clock tower on a corner of the Faubourg Laudance business centre. The street has three restaurants, a bank, drugstore, grocery store, liquor outlet and several other commercial tenants.

The story behind Avenue Calixa-Lavallée

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Screenshot from Google Maps

This street was named after Calixa Lavallée (1842-1891), best known for composing the music for “O Canada,” which officially became the national anthem of Canada in 1980.

The story behind Carré Cameron

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

Carré Cameron is not actually a square but a U-shaped street named in honour of British explorer Verney Lovett Cameron (1844-1894).

Born in Radipole, in Dorset, England, Cameron joined the Royal Navy in 1857, served in the Abyssinian campaign of 1868, and worked for a considerable time on the suppression of the East African slave trade.

Rue du Capitaine-Bernier

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
Rue du Capitaine-Bernier is named in honour of Captain Joseph-Elzéar Bernier (1852-1934), who was born in the village of L’Islet-sur-Mer, 100 km north-east of Quebec City. His father and grandfather were mariners, and he himself became a mariner and explorer of the Canadian North.

Street Views - Rue du Cap-Diamant

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Photo: Martin St-Amant - Wikipedia - CC-BY-SA-3.0

Rue du Cap-Diamant is a short street located on industrial land owned by the Quebec Port Authority off Boulevard Champlain below the Plains of Abraham.

Cap Diamant (or Cape Diamond) itself is the promontory on which the Upper Town of Quebec City is located, surrounded by the St. Lawrence River to the south and east and the much smaller St. Charles River to the north.

The story behind Rue Christie

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Photo: Ville de Montréal archives
This street is named in honour of Robert Christie (1787-1856), a lawyer, militia officer, historian and politician, who was born in Windsor, N.S., to parents who had emigrated from Scotland. Christie studied at King’s College and obtained his diploma sometime before 1803. 
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