Community News (Print edition)

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The story behind Rue Bethune

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
This street is named in honour of Dr. Norman Bethune (1890-1939), who was born in Gravenhurst, Ont.
 
In 1914, when the First World War was declared in Europe, Bethune interrupted his medical studies and joined the Canadian Army’s No. 2 Field Ambulance to serve as a stretcher bearer in France.

A voyage Into the Woods with the Phantom of the Opera

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau

A spooky pre-Halloween concert took place at the Morrin Centre on Oct. 29, featuring songs from such creepy musicals as The Phantom of the Opera, Into the Woods and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Superstar gamer Stéphanie Harvey comes home for special OSQ concert

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Photo: Peter Black

It would seem like an unlikely marriage: the stereotypical hoodie-clad video gamers and the tenue de ville classical music crowd. But the Orchestre Symphonique de Québec (OSQ) thinks it may have a winning combo in bringing together the two divergent worlds for special performances at the Grand Théâtre on Nov. 22 and 23.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow between the crosses …

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

In Flanders Fields” is a poem written during the First World War by Canadian physician Lt.-Col. John McCrae. He was inspired to write it on May 3, 1915, after presiding over the funeral of friend and fellow soldier Lt. Alexis Helmer, who died in the Second Battle of Ypres.

Flip Fabrique and the OSQ flip over the Grand Théâtre

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin
Flip Fabrique joined conductor Fabien Gabel and 81 musicians of the Orchestre Symphonique de Québec (OSQ) for a unique performance at the Grand Théâtre de Québec on Oct. 31. Circus acts mixed with fairy-tale compositions by Humperdinck, Ravel and Stravinsky surprised every spectator, even those familiar with both art forms. 

Trinity Fall Tea and Sale a treat!

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau

The Anglican Church Women of Trinity Church in Sainte-Foy have perfected the art of holding a tea and sale. Twice a year, every spring and fall, they get busy baking, knitting and collecting odds and ends for sale tables.

Tempêtes & Passions reveal romantic bel canto treasures

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau
It was a dark and stormy night, a perfect setting for a concert by Tempêtes & Passions in the ornate Chapelle du Musée de l’Amérique francophone in Old Quebec. 

The first years of the Waterloo Settlement:

Key figures - Shadgett and O’Dwyer

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Photo: James Barber

The beginning of what came to be known as the Waterloo Settlement started in 1821, following the mass arrival of new immigrants from the British Isles after the end of the Napoleonic Wars.

Thousands arrived in North America, and the Port of Quebec was the destination of choice for many of them. New lands were needed for some of the settlers, so this area was opened for colonization.

Bravi Productions presents Un Soir Pour l’Art

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Photo: courtesy of Bravi Productions

How could an evening filled with live performances of singing, piano, dancing and poetry delivered by some of Quebec City’s most talented artists be even more exciting? Having that evening focused solely on Canadian composers, artists, poets and painters, and while you’re at it, hosted in a beautiful venue.

Université Laval sports: football, rugby and soccer

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Photo: Jay Ouellet

The Université Laval Rouge et Or football team started its defence of the regional and national titles on Nov. 3 with a decisive 40-0 win over the Vert et Or of Université de Sherbrooke. Playing in front of fewer than 7,000 cold and wet football fans at Stade Telus, Laval took an 8-0 lead after the first quarter.