Street Views

The story behind Rue Audubon

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
This street in Beauport is named in honour of John James Audubon, an American ornithologist, naturalist and painter. He was noted for his extensive studies documenting all types of American birds and for his detailed illustrations that depicted the birds in their natural habitats. He was born in 1785 in Haiti to French parents and died Jan. 27, 1851 in New York. 

The story behind Rue de l’Aviation

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Photo: Screenshot from Google Maps

The name Rue de l’Aviation was granted to the Ville de Québec by the federal government in 1951 as a reminder of the major role played by the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) during the Second World War. Forty-eight squadrons (bombers, fighters and transport or reconnaissance planes) participated in all European Allied operations.

The story behind Rue de l’Apiculteur-Verret

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue de l’Apiculteur-Verret is named in honour of Jacques-Ferdinand Verret (1860-1946) who was a renowned beekeeper. Born in Charlesbourg (now part of Quebec City), he was the oldest of a family of 10 children. From a young age, he worked with his father, who owned a general store and bakery. He married Lucie Bédard in 1897 but the couple had no children. 

The story behind Rue Anne-Barbel

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Photo: Google Maps
This street is named in honour of a remarkable Quebec City-born businesswoman, Marie-Anne Barbel (1704-1793). She ran several successful businesses after her husband, Louis Fornel, died in 1745. The couple had 14 children of whom only five, four girls and one boy, survived to adulthood. 

The story behind Rue Alexander

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
This street is named in honour of Field Marshal Harold George Alexander, first Earl Alexander of Tunis, a senior British Army officer who served with distinction in both the First World War and the Second World War. 

STREET VIEWS: The story behind Rue de l’Ancienne-Cartoucherie

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Photo: Google Maps
Rue de l’Ancienne-Cartoucherie was named in honour of the former Dominion Arsenal that was located in the Saint-Malo industrial park in the 1940s. 

The story behind Rue and Parc Scott

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Photo: Google Maps

This short street and small park in the Saint-Jean-Baptiste neighbourhood of Quebec City are named in honour of William Fisher Scott (1785-1833), who was a notary public. He once owned a large piece of land in this area of the city.

The story behind Passage Anderson

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Photo: Google Maps

Passage Anderson is a footpath that runs from the intersection of 1ière Avenue and 8ième Rue to the pathway along the north shore of the St. Charles River in the La Cité-Limoilou borough of Quebec City. It is located on what was part of a farm that belonged to Anthony Anderson at the end of the 18th century.

The story behind Parc Alys–Robi

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons (Fair Use)
This park, opened in October 2016 in the Saint-Sauveur district, is named in honour of Lady Alys Robi , the first popular singer from Quebec to have an international career. She was born Alice Robitaille in Quebec City in 1923, in the working-class district of Saint-Sauveur.

STREET VIEWS: The story behind Rue Alfred-Laliberté

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain)
This short street, a cul-de-sac in the Cap-Rouge district of Quebec City, is named in honour of well-known painter and sculptor Alfred Laliberté (1878-1953). He was born in Sainte-Élizabeth-de-Warwick, in the Arthabaska district of Quebec.
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