Street Views

The story behind Rue Jacqueline-Auriol

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Jacqueline Auriol (1917-2000), a French aviator who set several world speed records. Born in Challans, France, the daughter of a wealthy shipbuilder, she graduated from the Université de Nantes, then studied at the École du Louvre in Paris.

The story behind Rue des Inuit

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named for the Aboriginal peoples who live in the northern regions of Canada. Historically, the Inuit were called “Eskimos,” a term that came into use in the 17th century to describe people inhabiting the Arctic regions of Canada, Greenland, Alaska and Siberia.

The story behind Parc Henri-Casault

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Charlesbourg hier et aujourd’hui Facebook page

This park is named in honour of Henri Casault (1922-2006), the mayor of Charlesbourg from 1968 to 1974 and from 1975 to 1980.

The story behind Autoroute Henri-IV

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This highway is named in honour of Henri IV (1553-1610), one of France’s greatest kings and a key figure in the country’s economic, military and cultural prowess during the 17th century. The first monarch of France from the House of Bourbon, Henri was King of Navarre (as Henri III) from 1572 and King of France from 1589 to 1610.

The story behind Boulevard Henri-Bourassa

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This wide boulevard is named in honour of Henri Bourassa (1868-1952), a politician and newspaper publisher. In 1896, he was elected to the House of Commons as an independent Liberal for Labelle.

The story behind Rue Hector-Laferté

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Hector Laferté, a Quebec lawyer and politician.

Born in Saint-Germain-de-Grantham in 1885, Laferté was educated at the Collège de Nicolet and Université Laval, where he was president of the university law students’ association. In 1909 he founded the Association de la Jeunesse libérale, and was one of its advisers.

The story behind Rue Lambert-Closse

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Jean Gagnon from Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street honours Raphaël-Lambert Closse (circa 1618-1662), who was born in Saint-Denis de Mogues, France. He was a merchant when he arrived in Ville-Marie (now called Montreal) in 1647.

The story behind Boulevard Langelier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Sir François Langelier (1838-1915), who was born in Sainte-Rosalie (now part of Saint-Hyacinthe). He was a lawyer, a professor at the faculty of law at Université Laval from 1863 to 1915 and dean from 1892 to 1915. He was also a politician and the 10th lieutenant governor of Quebec, a journalist and an author.

The story behind Avenue Honoré-Mercier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Honoré Mercier (1840-1894), lawyer, journalist and politician.

The story behind Rue Guillaume-Bresse

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Guillaume Bresse, born in 1833 in Saint-Mathias-sur-Richelieu. After primary school, he became a factory worker in Montreal. It is believed that Bresse learned the shoemaking trade while living in Massachusetts after emigrating there with numerous other Canadians.

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