Street Views

The story behind Jardin Jean-Paul-L’Allier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

It is a garden rather than a street that honours the memory of Jean-Paul L’Allier (1938- 2016), the 38th mayor of Quebec City from 1989 to 2005.

STREET VIEWS: The story behind Rue Jeanne-Sauvé

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Photo: Canadian Stamp News

This street is named in honour of Jeanne (née Benoit) Sauvé (1922-1993), who was the 23rd Governor General of Canada from 1984 to 1990. Born in Saskatchewan, she studied at the University of Ottawa and worked for the federal government as a translator in order to pay her tuition.

The story behind Boulevard Jean-Lesage

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This wide boulevard is named in honour of Jean Lesage (1912-1980). Born in Montreal, Lesage was a lawyer who served as the 19th premier of Quebec from 1960 to 1966.

The story behind Rue Jean-Brillant

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street honours Jean Baptiste Arthur Brillant (1890-1918), who was born in Routhierville in the Lower Saint Lawrence region. One of the bravest Canadian officers during the First World War, Brillant was awarded the Victoria Cross (VC), the most prestigious award for gallantry that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

The story behind Place Jean-Béliveau

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

The large open area in front of the Videotron Centre is named in honour of hockey legend Jean Béliveau (1931-2014). Born in Trois-Rivières, he began his hockey career at age 15 with the Victoriaville Panthers. He was later recruited by the Citadelles de Québec and the As de Québec, where he became the incontestable star.

The story behind Rue Jacques-Parizeau

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Harvey Majo from Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Jacques Parizeau (1930-2015), the 26th premier of Quebec. Born in Montreal, he was the son of Gérard Parizeau, who built one of Quebec’s great fortunes and one of the province’s largest financial firms from a brokerage he established in the 1930s.

The story behind Rue Hocquart

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Gilles Hocquart (1694-1783) who was the intendant of New France from 1729 to 1748, the longest intendancy in the colony’s history.

The story behind Rue J.-Armand-Bombardier

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Joseph-Armand Bombardier (1907-1964), who was born in Valcourt, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. He was an inventor and businessman who founded Bombardier Inc., which is now a multinational manufacturer of planes and trains. His most famous invention was the snowmobile, including a smaller recreational model that became known as the Ski-Doo.

The story behind Rue Jacqueline-Auriol

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named in honour of Jacqueline Auriol (1917-2000), a French aviator who set several world speed records. Born in Challans, France, the daughter of a wealthy shipbuilder, she graduated from the Université de Nantes, then studied at the École du Louvre in Paris.

The story behind Rue des Inuit

STREET VIEWS

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

This street is named for the Aboriginal peoples who live in the northern regions of Canada. Historically, the Inuit were called “Eskimos,” a term that came into use in the 17th century to describe people inhabiting the Arctic regions of Canada, Greenland, Alaska and Siberia.

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