Arts & Entertainment News (Print edition)

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Irish dancers do it again at Vieux-Québec Feis 2019

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Photo: Allison Kirkwood

Some 200 dancers from eastern Canada and the northern United States were on stage showing off their talent at the sixth annual Vieux-Québec Feis held at Séminaire Saint-François on Sept. 28. Ranging in age from four years to adult, and from beginner to championship, they competed on four stages in soft shoe and hard shoe, while proud parents, family and friends looked on.

 

FLIP Fabrique’s Blizzard takes Le Diamant by storm

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin

In the wake of the autumn equinox, FLIP Fabrique landed at Le Diamant theatre with Blizzard from Sept. 24 to 28. For most Quebecers, winter can wait until December, but not for this circus group. Once the audience was seated, a meteorologist from the Department of Cold, Chills and Brrrr warned them of the impending winter storm.

Kuessipan wins the QCFF Feature Film Award

QUEBEC CITY FILM FESTIVAL

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin

Kuessipan shows everything that is wonderful, uplifting and difficult about growing up in Uashat, an Innu community next to Sept-Îles, Quebec. The film’s première on Sept. 18 at the Quebec City Film Festival (QCFF) shone the spotlight on Innu culture.

Les Violons du Roy bring new life to Nosferatu

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin

For over a century, stories about vampires and the undead have piqued the curiosity of the masses. The undead have been featured in countless television series, movies and books, but where did it all start? It’s hard to say, but we do know that Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror brought Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula to the screen … even if it was an unauthorized version.

QCFF honours documentary filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin

QUEBEC CITY FILM FESTIVAL

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin

Apart from celebrating cinema, the Quebec City Film Festival (QCFF) is about marking cinematic milestones. This year, it honoured the First Nations, the Métis Nation and the Innu by shining the spotlight on legendary documentary filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin.

“That’s a wrap!” for highly successful film festival

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin

Since its beginning in 2011, the Quebec City Film Festival (QCFF) has been working toward becoming one of Canada’s major cinematic festivals. Over the years the audience has increased dramatically and the program has exploded.

Tempêtes et Passions set the stage for the season

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau

Tempêtes et Passions kicked off their 2019-2020 season magnificently with the fundraising Grande Fête Lyrique, held on Sept. 16 in the Chapelle du Musée de l’Amérique Francophone.

St-Roch XP, where the cool kids hang out

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Photo: Danielle Burns

The multifaceted St-Roch XP (Expérience) festival that took place from Sept. 12 to 15 emphasized the sights, sounds, shows and flavours that make this urban neighbourhood a place “where the cool kids hang out” to dine, drink, dance and go out on the town.

Walking the red carpet at the Quebec City Film Festival

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Photo: Cassandra Kerwin

As another beautiful end-of-summer day turned to dusk on Sept. 12, the crowd settled in at Place d’Youville. There they found rows of white Adirondack chairs facing a giant screen. Between the seats, a red carpet flowed like a river from the staircase of the nearby Palais Montcalm.

Chalmers-Wesley Classic Film Club premières on Sept. 20

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain

If you love classic cinema and would like to experience a night at the movies as it was “back in the day,” Chalmers-Wesley United Church (78 Rue Sainte-Ursule in Old Quebec) has a new series for you and your friends!