Street Views

The story behind Rue du Marché-Finlay

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue du Marché-Finlay is named after the merchant William Finlay who played a leading role in the business world of Quebec City in the 19th century. Possibly a native of Kilmarnock, Scotland, he arrived in Quebec sometime between 1798 and 1805 and by 1808, he was working for the powerful merchant John Mure.

The story behind Rue Mary-Travers

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Photo: Bill Cox
This street was named in honour of Mary Rose-Anna Travers (1894-1941). A legendary Quebec singer/songwriter known as “La Bolduc.” Born in Newport on the Gaspé coast, her father Lawrence Travers was of Irish descent and her mother was a French-Canadian Mi’kmaq.  

The story behind Rue de la Belle-Angélique

Street Views:

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau
Normally, Bill Cox prepares the weekly “Street Views” column, but because I have an unusual connection to the person after whom this new street in Charlesbourg is named, I felt I had to write a “view” of this particular one.

Rue Richard-Turner

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Photo: from Wikipedia Public Domain
Rue Richard-Turner is named in honour of Sir Richard Ernest William Turner. Born into a prominent Quebec City business family, he worked at his father’s grocery and lumber business, rising to partner before the Great War. He later took over the business when he returned from the War. 

The story behind Rue de la Ristigouche

Street Views:

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue de la Ristigouche is named after the Restigouche River (Ristigouche in French) that flows into the Baie des Chaleurs near Campbellton in northeastern New Brunswick and Dalhousie in Quebec. The river is part of the border between the two provinces. 

The story behind Rue Sherbrooke

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Photo: Wikimedia Common Domain
Rue Sherbrooke, also referred to as Côte Sherbrooke, is named in honour of Sir John Coape Sherbrooke (1764-1830). After serving with the British army in Nova Scotia, the Netherlands, India, the Mediterranean (including Sicily) and Spain, Sherbrooke was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia in 1811.

The story behind Rue de Stadaconé

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue de Stadaconé (Stadacona in English) was named after the 16th-century Iroquois village on the shore of the St. Charles River in the Limoilou district of present Quebec City. 

The story behind Chemin Sainte-Foy

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Photo: Bill Cox
The origin of the name of this busy thoroughfare has various hypotheses.

The story behind Rue Stanley

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue Stanley is named in honour of Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904) who was born John Rowlands. He was famous for his exploration of central Africa and his search for missionary and explorer David Livingstone. 

The story behind Avenue Sarah

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Photo: Bill Cox

Avenue Sarah was named in honour of Sarah Maxfield, the mother of the prosperous timber merchant and businessman William Sheppard, who owned Woodfield estate in Sillery. Sheppard also honoured his mother by naming one of his sons Maxfield.

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