Street Views

STREET VIEWS: Rue Virginia-Woolf

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Photo: Wikipedia Common Domain
This street is named in honour of Adeline Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), a British writer who is considered one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century and a pioneer in the use of  “stream of consciousness” as a narrative device.

The story behind Rue Vincent-Massey

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Photo: Bill Cox
This street in Saint-Malo industrial park is named in honour of the Right Honorable Vincent Massey (1887-1967), the 18th Governor of General of Canada. He was the first Canadian appointed to the post, and from that day the Governor General has always been a Canadian citizen. 

The story behind Rue du Yukon

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Photo: Bill Cox
Rue du Yukon is named after the smallest and westernmost of Canada’s three northern territories (the other two are Northwest Territories and Nunavut).

Rue Thomas Pope

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Photo: Bill Cox
This street is named in honour of Thomas Pope, the 10th mayor of Quebec City, who was born to Scottish immigrants in Prescott, Upper Canada (Ontario), on October 16, 1825. He was sent to Scotland at an early age to be educated, and after his return, he became a lawyer after articling under Jean-François-Joseph Duval, who later became Chief Justice of Quebec. 

Rue William-Bartlett

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Photo: Bill Cox
This short gravelled road was named in honour of William Henry Bartlett (1809-1854), a British artist, born in Kentish Town (now part of London, England), best known for his numerous steel engravings. From 1822 to 1829 he did his design apprenticeship with the architect John Britton. His designs were used to illustrate Britton’s books and those of other London editors. 

Avenue de Varsovie

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Photo: Adrian Grycuk from Wikimedia Commons
This street is named in honour of  Warsaw (Varsovie in French, Warszawa in Polish), the capital of Poland. The city was founded around 1280 by the dukes of Mazovia, who built a castle on the Vistula River. 

STREET VIEWS: The story of Rue William-Marsh

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Photo: Bill Cox
This very short street in the Saint-Émile district of Quebec City is named in honour of a successful businessman in the shoe industry. It was around 1888 that William A. Marsh opened a factory to make high quality boots and shoes in the Saint-Roch area of Quebec City. It was located in a large building on Rue Saint-Vallier Est between Rue Dorchester and Rue Narcisse-Belleau.

STREET VIEWS: Rue William-Scott

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Photo: Bill Cox
This street is named in honour of William Scott (1822-?) who was of Irish descent. His first marriage was to Camille Laberge and the second was to Eleonore or Ellen Archer, who was from Ontario. In 1871, he owned land and two houses in Cap-Rouge.

The story behind Rue Van Gogh

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Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) was a Dutch painter whose subjects, during his early years, were peasants and still lifes. Like the older Dutch masters such as Rembrandt, he adopted the light-darkness method, as seen in the Potato Diners (1885). 

STREET VIEWS: The story behind Avenue Watt

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Avenue Watt is named in honour of Scottish engineer James Watt (1736-1819). In 1763, James Watt was working as instrument maker at the University of Glasgow when he was assigned the job of repairing a Newcomen steam engine and noted how inefficient it was. In 1765, Watt conceived the idea of equipping the engine with a separate condensation chamber.
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