Street Views

Street Views - Rue du Cap-Diamant

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Photo: Martin St-Amant - Wikipedia - CC-BY-SA-3.0

Rue du Cap-Diamant is a short street located on industrial land owned by the Quebec Port Authority off Boulevard Champlain below the Plains of Abraham.

Cap Diamant (or Cape Diamond) itself is the promontory on which the Upper Town of Quebec City is located, surrounded by the St. Lawrence River to the south and east and the much smaller St. Charles River to the north.

The story behind Rue Christie

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Photo: Ville de Montréal archives
This street is named in honour of Robert Christie (1787-1856), a lawyer, militia officer, historian and politician, who was born in Windsor, N.S., to parents who had emigrated from Scotland. Christie studied at King’s College and obtained his diploma sometime before 1803. 

The story behind Rue Braille

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Rue Braille was named in honour of Louis Braille, who invented a system of reading and writing for use by the blind or visually impaired. The system he devised remains virtually unchanged to this day, and is known worldwide simply as braille. 

The story behind Rue Bethune

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
This street is named in honour of Dr. Norman Bethune (1890-1939), who was born in Gravenhurst, Ont.
 
In 1914, when the First World War was declared in Europe, Bethune interrupted his medical studies and joined the Canadian Army’s No. 2 Field Ambulance to serve as a stretcher bearer in France.

The story behind Rue de Bergerville

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Photo: Google Maps

Rue de Bergerville and Parc Bergerville recall the village of Bergerville, created around 1850 in the sector north of the Woodfield Domain that was once part of the Saint-Michel estate in Sillery.

The story behind Rue du Bélier

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Photo: via Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
Rue du Bélier is named after the adult male sheep (the ram). Rams are recognizable by their large spiral horns. Now raised around the world for their wool, meat and milk, sheep were among the first animals domesticated by human beings. Male sheep are called rams, the females are ewes and young sheep are lambs.

The story behind Rue William-Wood

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Photo: courtesy of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec

This new street that has just been opened in the Cap-Rouge neighbourhood of Quebec City is named in honour of William Wood, who was born in Quebec City in 1864. He was the son of George Augustus Leslie Wood, a merchant, and Charlotte Feodore Louisa Augusta Guérout.

The story behind Rue John-Simons

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Photo: Shirley Nadeau

This new street, still under construction in a residential area of the Haute-Saint-Charles borough of Quebec City, near the intersection of Boulevard Henri-IV and Avenue Chauveau, was named in July of this year in honour of the founder of La Maison Simons department stores.

The story behind Rue Triquet

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
This street honours Paul Triquet, V.C. (1910-1980),  an officer of the Royal 22e Régiment, born in Cabano, Quebec.

Triquet enrolled in the Canadian Army in 1927 and participated in the Italian campaign during the Second World War.

The story behind Rue de la Beauce

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Photo: Google Maps
This street is named in honour of a section of the Chaudière-Appalaches region that extends southeast of the city of Lévis to the Canada-U.S. border. 

The towns of Saint-Georges, Sainte-Marie, Beauceville and Vallée-Jonction are located on the banks of the Chaudière River, which flows through this picturesque valley to the St. Lawrence River.
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