August 27 2008 Edition

The fireworks

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Photo: David Cannon 

The fireworks finale of the last movement of the OSQ’s rendition of Carmina Burana. Photo courtesy Société du 400e.

OSQ gets warm reception in chilly open air

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Photo: David Cannon

The Orchestre Symphonique de Québec’s Pleins Feux concert on the Plains of Abraham received a very warm reception from concert-goers on what was otherwise a cold and autumn-like night.

An army of 50,000 descended onto the plains last Monday night, with folding chairs and dressed in winter clothing, to hear Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture and Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana.

Golf returns to the Plains

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The Morning Chronicle noted the unusual sight of a Scottish mariner teeing up a couple of “gutties” on the Plains of Abraham in 1854. The now familiar Scottish tradition, the sport of golf, will be returning to the Plains this week after nearly a century-long absence as part of the city’s 400th anniversary celebrations.

Slow progress on St. Matthew’s Cemetery clean-up, Most of graffiti removed

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Photo: Scott French

The City of Québec is slowly but surely progressing in its revitalization of St. Matthew’s Cemetery-turned-city-park in the St-Jean-Baptiste neighborhood. Most of the anti-Anglo graffiti has been removed from the Protestant cemetery’s headstones. Security personnel are now monitoring the park 16 hours a day to discourage any further vandalism.

MEMORIALS AND THINGS OF FAME

The Morning Chronicle
1848

Remembering Boucher

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Photo: Mike Reshitnyk

Days after the first anniversary of the death of former Quebec City mayor Andrée Boucher, her elected successor, Régis Labeaume, confirmed the city’s plans for commemorating her contribution to public service.

Tour guide deplores book purge

As a Québec City tour guide, I make a point of taking visitors to the chaussée des Écossais and talking about the contribution of the anglophone community to the history of our city.

I tell them about the City Gaol, Morrin College and the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec, insisting proudly on the fact that the latter was the first learned society in Canada.

LHSQ is “selling our heritage”

Dr. Peter Sabor, FRSC Canada Research Chair in 18th-Century Studies McGill University

Thomas Feininger’s eloquent letter in the August 6 Chronicle-Telegraph, “LHSQ’s Patrimony for Sale,” has now been answered in the August 20 QCT by David F. Blair, President of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec.

Society’s silent auction provokes outrage

Thomas A. Reisner, Professor of English Literature (retired) Université Laval

I am sure I speak for many readers of the Chronicle when I express outrage and revulsion at what can only be characterized as the rank hypocrisy of David F. Blair’s apologia for the silent auction currently under way at the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec.

Quebec City blown away by the Sands of Time exhibit

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Photo: Scott French

Sculptor Michel Lepine built his vision for the Sands of Time exhibit at Expo-Québec one grain at a time over the last three years. Lepine’s hard work was rewarded last the weekend as hundreds of people stood patiently in line to see the exhibit, some waiting upwards of 45 minutes.

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